Pressing the Pause Button on the Present Moment

How many times have you heard people say “time seems to be speeding up.”  Even more people seem to be unaware that time, or space-time, while being an integral part to our understanding of physics and the universe, is contextual and flexible.  I have done this experiment many times where you ask a group of people with their eyes closed to raise their hand when a minute goes by.  You would be amazed at how our perception of time is so vastly different.  

I have also noticed that more and more people, especially younger people, are diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.  So many kids are taking medications for disorders that may have more to do with a lack of experiencing time than it does with brain chemistry.  Recent research points to the importance of boredom for development: http://www.bbc.com/news/education-21895704

If children never have a chance to reflect and experience time, they are often forced to live the time and schedule set out by adults.  The time and speed by which most adults live is not suitable for children.  Children’s brains need time to pick daisies and wonder.  If their lives are filled with programmed activities and they never get to sit and wonder, how can they really know what time is like?  Attention deficit, in some kids, may be an issue of not ever getting to learn what it is like to experience present moment in their own context.  

As adults, many of us still have no idea what a moment feels like.  In fact, most of our decisions are made under pressure.  Rarely, do we stop and really think about decisions anymore.  We often have to make decisions quickly because we decided to pack so much into our lives.  We forget that the present moment is a product of the past decisions.  If we can press the big pause button on our forehead, we can create an environment where we can make better decisions in our life.  If perception of time is a purely mental construct then we should be able to pause it whenever we want.  We should be able to stop time.  

If you could stop time and think about how you got where you are at today, what would you learn about your past decisions?  If you could make decisions without time being a factor, what would you choose your future life to look like?  

Meditation offers the opportunity to press pause.  Next time you need to make a decision or just check in with yourself, press that big pause button on your forehead.

Brett